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Phillips 66 Things to know about:

66 Things You Must Know About Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Jose Cruz and Jimmy Wynn
Presented by Phillips 66, proud sponsors of Minute Maid Park's Home Run Alley
(All rankings, records and statistics are current as of March 1, 2013)

66 things to know about: Jeff Bagwell | Craig Biggio | Jose Cruz | Jimmy Wynn

Jeff Bagwell
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Jeff Bagwell

1. Traded to the Astros on August 30, 1990 for reliever Larry Anderson.

2. Made his Major League debut on April 8, 1991, going 0-for-3 in a 6-2 loss against the Cincinnati Reds. Played his final regular season game on October 2, 2005, going 0-for-1 in a 6-4 victory against the Chicago Cubs.

3. His #5 was retired by the Astros on August 26, 2007.

4. Career team leader in home runs (449), RBIs (1,529), walks (1,401), intentional walks (155), and wins above replacement, or WAR (76.7).

5. Holds the Astros' single season record for batting average (.368 in 1994), home runs (47; 2000), runs (152; 2000), total bases (363; 2000), walks (149; 1999), on-base percentage (.454; 1999), slugging percentage (.750; 1994), OPS (1.201; 1994), intentional walks (27; 1997), and at-bats per home run (10.3; 1994).

6. All-time ranks (top 66): 22nd with a .948 OPS (on-base percentage + slugging percentage); 28th with 1,401 walks; 36th with 449 career home runs and 76.7 WAR; 37th with a .540 slugging percentage; 39th with 1,788 runs created; 41st with .408 on-base percentage; 42nd with 969 extra base hits; 46th with 1,529 RBIs; 63rd with 1,517 runs; 65th with 488 doubles.

7. Won National League Rookie of the Year in 1991, the first Astro to win the award. He hit .294 with a .387 on-base percentage, 15 home runs and 82 RBIs.

8. Won National League Most Valuable Player in 1994, the first Astro to win the award. He hit .368 with a .451 on-base percentage, 39 home runs and 116 RBIs. Altogether, he would finish in the top 10 of MVP voting six times, including three top 3 finishes.

9. Named to four National League All-Star teams (1994, 1996, 1997 and 1999), won three National League Silver Sluggers, awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position (1994, 1997 and 1999), and won a National League Gold Glove, awarded annually to honor superior individual fielding performances, in 1994.

10. Had nine seasons with at least 30 home runs and/or 100 runs scored; eight seasons with at least 100 RBIs; seven seasons with at least 100 walks; and six seasons with a .300 batting average.

11. One of only 31 players in history to finish a career with 1,500 RBIs and 1,500 runs scored.

12. From 1996 through 2001, reached at least 30 home runs, 100 RBIs, and 100 runs, one of only six players to ever do so consecutively in a six-year stretch.

13. One of only four infielders, and the only full-time first baseman, to post multiple 30/30 seasons (30 home runs; 30 steals). He first did it in 1997 (43 home runs and 31 steals) and then again in 1999 (42 and 30)

14. Became the team's all-time home run leader on April 21, 1999 when he hit three home runs in a 10-3 victory against the Chicago Cubs to pass Jimmy Wynn's 223 home runs.

15. In 2000, became the first player in NL history, and only the fifth in Major League history, to post a 45-homer, 100-RBI, 150-run season, joining Babe Ruth, Joe DiMaggio, Jimmy Foxx and Lou Gehrig.

16. In 2000, he joined Hank Aaron, Joe DiMaggio, Frank Robinson and Ted Williams as the only players to ever record 300 home runs, 1,000 RBI and 1,000 runs in their first 10 years of Major League Baseball.

17. Became the fourth Astro to hit for the cycle on July 18, 2001, going 4-for-5 with 5 RBIs in a 17-11 victory over St. Louis. On April 8, 2002, Craig Biggio joined him, going 4-for-4 with 4 RBIs and a walk in an 8-4 victory against the Colorado Rockies.

66 things to know about: Jeff Bagwell | Craig Biggio | Jose Cruz | Jimmy Wynn

Craig Biggio
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Craig Biggio

18. Selected by the Astros 22nd overall in the 1987 amateur draft.

19. Made his Major League debut on June 26, 1988, going 0-for-2 with a walk and a run scored in a 6-0 victory against the San Francisco Giants. Played his final regular season game on September 30, 2007, going 1-for-4 with a run scored in a 3-0 victory against the Atlanta Braves.

20. His #7 was retired by the Astros on August 17, 2008.

21. Career team leader in hits (3,060), runs (1,844), doubles (668), extra base hits (1,014), total bases (4,711), runs created (1,832), games played (2,850), plate appearances (12,504), and at-bats (10,876).

22. Holds the Astros' single season record for hits (210 in 1998), doubles (56; 1999), WAR (9.3; 1997), and plate appearances (749; 1997).

23. All-time ranks (top 66): 2nd with 285 hit-by-pitches; 5th with 668 doubles; 12th with 10,876 at-bats; 15th with 1,844 runs; 21st with 3,060 hits; 31st with 1,014 extra base hits; 32nd with 1,832 runs created; 64th with 414 stolen bases; 65th with 1,160 walks.

24. Won the Branch Rickey Award in 1997, given annually to an individual in recognition of his exceptional community service, and won the Roberto Clemente Award in 2007, given annually to the player who "best exemplifies the game of baseball, sportsmanship, community involvement and the individual's contribution to his team."

25. Named to seven All-Star teams (1991-1992, 1994- 1998), and was the first player in history to be named an All-Star at catcher and second base; won five Silver Slugger awards (1989, 1994-1998), and was one of only seven players to win a Silver Slugger at two different positions (catcher and second base); won four Gold Gloves, all as a second baseman (1994-1997).

26. Had eight seasons with at least 20 home runs and/or 100 runs scored; seven seasons with at least 40 doubles; five seasons with at least 30 stolen bases; and four seasons with a .300 batting average.

27. Became the first Astro and 27th player in Major League Baseball history to reach the 3,000-hit plateau on June 28, 2007, going 5-for-6 with 1 run scored and an RBI in an 8-5 victory against the Colorado Rockies.

28. Only player in the history of baseball with at least 3,000 hits, 600 doubles, 400 stolen bases, and 250 home runs.

29. One of only five players in history with 250 home runs and 400 stolen bases (Barry Bonds, Bobby Bonds, Rickey Henderson and Joe Morgan).

30. Holds the National League record for most lead-off home runs in a career with 53. He is third overall (behind Alfonso Soriano and Rickey Henderson).

31. Only player in history to record 1,000 at-bats as a catcher, a second baseman and a center fielder.

32. In 1997, became the first player in baseball history not to hit into a single double play while playing an entire 162 game season.

33. In 1998, became the second player to record at least 50 doubles and 50 stolen bases in the same season, and the first since 1912 (Tris Speaker). Also became one of only four infielders (and 11 players overall) to record at least 20 home runs and at least 50 steals in the same season.

34. In 2000, became the team's all-time leader in at-bats, hits and total bases, passing then-first base coach, Jose Cruz, who previously held each of those marks. A year later, Biggio passed Cruz for most games played in the history of the Houston franchise.

66 things to know about: Jeff Bagwell | Craig Biggio | Jose Cruz | Jimmy Wynn

Jose Cruz
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Jose Cruz

35. Purchased by the Astros in 1974 (from the St. Louis Cardinals).

36. Made his Astro debut on April 7, 1975, going 3-for-4 with a home run and 3 RBIs in a 6-2 victory against the Atlanta Braves. Played his final regular season game as an Astro on October 4, 1987, going 0-for-4 with a walk in a 2-1 loss against the Cincinnati Reds.

37. His #25 was retired by the Astros on October 3, 1992.

38. Finished his Astro career ranked 1st with 80 triples; 3rd with 1,879 games played, 6,629 at-bats, and 1,937 hits; 4th with 942 RBIs; 5th with 871 runs scored and 335 doubles; 6th with a .292 batting average; and 8th with 138 home runs.

39. Led the team in RBIs seven times (1978-1981, 1983-1985); batting average four times (1978, 1983-1985); and home runs three times (1979, 1981 and 1984). Among qualifiers, was the team's Triple Crown winner in 1979 (.289, 9 home runs, 72 RBIs) and 1984 (.312, 12 home runs, 95 RBIs).

40. Was voted the Astros' team MVP by the Houston chapter of the Baseball Writers of America Association (BBWAA) four times (1977, 1980, 1983 and 1984).

41. A native of Puerto Rico, was named Puerto Rico's Pro Athlete of the Year in 1981 and was inducted into the Hispanic Heritage Baseball Museum Hall of Fame in 2002.

42. Named to two All-Star teams (1980 and 1985); won two Silver Slugger awards (1983 and 1984), and finished in the top 8 of Most Valuable Player voting three times (1980, 1983 and 1984).

43. Had six seasons with a .300 batting average; five seasons with at least 80 RBIs and/or 30 stolen bases; four seasons with at least 30 doubles; and three seasons with at least 185 hits.

44. Finished in the top six in National League batting average three times (1978, 1983 and 1984), hitting a combined .315 in those three seasons (totaling 554 hits).

45. Led the National League with 189 hits in 1983, the only Astro to ever lead the league in hits. Between 1980 and 1985, only five players in baseball had more than Cruz's 990 hits.

46. Totaled six walk-off homers in his career, the most by any Astro.

47. Participated in every Astro postseason (through 2005) as either a player (1980-1981 and 1986) or coach (1997-1999, 2001, 2004 and 2005).

48. Led the team with 91 RBIs in 1980, helping the Astros clinch their first postseason appearance. Also hit 26 doubles, stole 36 bases and batted .302. In the 1980 National League Championship series against the Philadelphia Phillies, hit .400 with a .609 on-base percentage. In the five-game series, Cruz totaled four RBIs, six hits and eight walks, including a record four intentional.

49. Led the team with 13 home runs and 55 RBIs in strike-shortened 1981, helping the Astros clinch their second postseason appearance. In the 1981 National League Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, hit .300 in the five-game series, bringing his career postseason batting average to .343 with 12 hits in 10 games.

66 things to know about: Jeff Bagwell | Craig Biggio | Jose Cruz | Jimmy Wynn

Jimmy Wynn
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Jimmy Wynn

50. Selected by the Colt 45s in the 1962 first-year expansion draft (from the Cincinnati Reds).

51. Made his Major League debut (as a shortstop) July 10, 1963, going 1-for-4 in a 2-0 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates. Played his final regular season game as an Astro on September 24, 1973, going 0-for-3 with two walks and two runs scored in a 10-6 victory against the San Francisco Giants.

52. His #24 was retired by the Astros on June 25, 2005.

53. Finished his Astro career ranked 4th with 223 home runs and 847 walks; 6th with 829 runs and 5,063 at-bats; 7th with 719 RBIs and 1,426 games played; 8th with 1,291 hits; and 10th with a .362 on-base percentage and 180 stolen bases. Upon his departure after the 1973 season, led the team in career home runs (223), RBIs (719), runs (829), walks (847) and at-bats (5,063).

54. Led the team in home runs for six consecutive seasons (1965-1970), and finished among the top 10 in the National League in 1967 (2nd), 1968 (6th), 1969 (5th), and 1972 (10th). Led the team in slugging percentage five times (1965, 1967-1970); on-base percentage (1968-1970, 1972) and OPS (1965, 1968-1970) four times; and RBIs twice (1965 and 1967). His single-season records for home runs, RBIs, runs and walks stood a combined 90 years.

55. His 131 OPS+ (on-base percentage + slugging percentage, adjusted for park effects) as an Astro matches Hall Famers Rod Carew and Wade Boggs while besting Hall of Famers Roberto Clemente (130) and Eddie Murray (129), among others.

56. Hit 93 home runs inside the Astrodome during his Astro career; four more after leaving the team in 1974. Altogether, his 97 indoor home runs were the most in baseball history until 1988.

57. His 8.5 offensive WAR (wins above replacement, no fielding) in 1969 is an Astro single season record. Overall, his 39.4 WAR as an Astro ranks sixth in team history.

58. Named to the 1967 National League All-Star team after hitting .273 with 21 home runs, 65 RBIs and posting a .904 OPS in the season's first 81 games.

59. Hit 37 home runs in 1967, the first Astro to hit at least 30 home runs in a season. Wynn would eventually lose the National League home run title to Hank Aaron, who hit 39. Wynn would later recall, "Hank said, 'Jimmy Wynn should be the home run champion because he had to play in the Astrodome.' Being number two to Hank Aaron - the greatest home run hitter of all time - is truly an honor." Wynn's 37 dingers would be the most by an Astro until Jeff Bagwell hit 39 in 1994.

60. Drove in 107 runs in 1967, the first Astro to total at least 100 RBIs in a season. It would be the most by an Astro until Bob Watson drove in 110 in 1977.

61. Returning to his hometown of Cincinnati, OH, would launch a home run over the 58-foot scoreboard and onto Interstate 75 outside Crosley Field on June 10, 1967. The home run was the longest in that field's history.

62. Recorded the franchise's first three-home run game - all solo shots - on June 15, 1967 in a 6-2 victory against the San Francisco Giants.

63. Reached base (by hit, walk, error and/or hit-by-pitch) in a team-record 66 consecutive games in 1969, the sixth-longest streak in baseball history. During the stretch, which began May 20 and ended August 3, Wynn hit .305 with a .478 on-base percentage. He would combine for 142 hits/walks (68 hits, 74 walks), blast 17 HRs, and drive in 44 runs. The Astros would win 40 of the 66 games en route to the franchise's first non-losing season.

64. Drew a Major League-leading 148 walks in 1969, a National League record that stood for 29 years. He would finish the season with a .436 on-base percentage, the best of his career and the sixth-best single season mark in team history.

65. Became the first player to hit a regular season home run into the Astrodome's upper deck on April 12, 1970. The seat that Wynn hit was marked for posterity with an image of a cannon. When the Astrodome was renovated in the 1980s, Wynn was given the seat, which resided in the slugger's living room for many years.

66. Scored a run in 11 consecutive games in 1972, the longest streak in team history. During the stretch, he would score 12 runs while batting .324 with a .511 on-base percentage, helping the Astros to the franchise's first winning season. Altogether, Wynn would score 117 runs, a team record that would stand for 23 years.