ARLINGTON -- Astros relief pitcher Brandon Lyon is expected to miss the rest of the season after it was announced Wednesday he will undergo shoulder surgery next week in Pensacola, Fla., a procedure that will be performed by noted orthopedist James Andrews.

Lyon, who's on the disabled list with right biceps tendinitis, will meet with Andrews June 29 to discuss exactly what kind of procedure will be performed on his shoulder the following day. Lyon has been pitching with biceps tendinitis and a partial tear of his rotator cuff, as well as a tear in his labrum.

"There's definitely some issues," Lyon said. "They're going in there to fix my shoulder. When they go in there, they can know more [about] what they have to do."

Lyon, who is in the second year of a three-year, $15 million deal, was on the disabled list from May 5-June 9 because of his shoulder issues. He made three appearances after being activated, allowing a home run in each of those games, and landed back on the DL on June 14.

Astros general manager Ed Wade said having surgery to repair biceps tendinitis is rare in pitchers, though it has been performed on athletes in other sports, as well as non-athletes.

"It's unique in those circumstances," Wade said. "I know he's going to be in good hands with Dr. Andrews doing the procedure. [Team medical director] Dr. [David] Lintner is going to try to get there to Pensacola and assist in the surgery. Our hope is that everything moves in a straight line and we get Brandon back here at whatever point the doctors say he's good to go."

Lyon, 31, went 6-6 with 20 saves in 22 chances with the Astros last year. He took over for Matt Lindstrom as closer full-time on Aug. 1 and saved 19 games in 20 chances in the final two months of the season, ranking tied for first in the Majors in that span.

He struggled out of the gate this year, blowing four saves early in the season. He's appeared in 15 games and is 3-3 with an 11.48 ERA. The only thing Lyon is concerned about now is getting healthy and getting ready for next year.

"Going in to have a surgery, no one knows how you're going to react or be able to come back from it," Lyon said. "Let's get to the bottom line. They know there's some issues with my labrum. I had a cyst [drained last January] and that doesn't get developed because of a biceps tendon. That gets developed because of your labrum. Dr. Andrews has done a lot of shoulders, and he'll read the MRI and get his hands on me Wednesday and then go in Thursday and have something done."