ANAHEIM -- Angels catcher Chris Iannetta was out of the Angels' starting lineup for the third straight game on Saturday, due to lingering soreness on his right hand/wrist area after being hit by a pitch on Wednesday -- the night of Jered Weaver's no-hitter.

Iannetta did come in as a defensive replacement during Friday's ninth inning, after Alberto Callaspo pinch-hit for Bobby Wilson, but he isn't ready to start just yet.

"It's just the progression," manager Mike Scioscia said. "He did take some soft-toss today, he took some swings, feeling progress, but still a little stiff. We're hopeful tomorrow he's going to come out and he's going to play."

Iannetta, acquired from the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Tyler Chatwood in November, is batting .220 with a .324 on-base percentage and three homers in 23 games.

Wilson, the backup catcher, caught C.J. Wilson for the first time this season on Saturday.

Angels trade 7-foot-1 Van Mil to Indians

ANAHEIM -- The Angels dealt Minor League relief pitcher Loek Van Mil to the Indians on Saturday in exchange for future considerations, which will probably end up being cash.

Acquired from the Twins in September 2010 as the player to be named later in the deal that sent lefty Brian Fuentes to Minnesota, Van Mil posted a 2.04 ERA in 30 games for Double-A Arkansas last year. In Triple-A Salt Lake this year, while pitching in the hitter-friendly Pacific Coast League, the 27-year-old right-hander had given up 10 runs (seven earned) in 10 innings.

Van Mil, 7-foot-1, is the tallest player in pro baseball and one of only a handful from the Netherlands.

Angels using myriad of two-hole hitters

ANAHEIM -- As Angels manager Mike Scioscia has continually altered his lineup, going through an American League-leading 25 combinations through the season's first 28 games, it's the No. 2 spot that has suddenly become a revolving door.

With Howie Kendrick batting sixth more often -- though he slid to fifth with Albert Pujols out on Saturday -- Scioscia has used three different No. 2 hitters in this homestand, mostly behind new leadoff hitter Mike Trout.

It's been Maicer Izturis, it's been Vernon Wells and, as it was Saturday, it's been Alberto Callaspo.

Scioscia would ideally like to have a steady 1-2 punch at the top of the order, as he tried to have with Erick Aybar and Kendrick at the start of the year, but it's not possible if guys aren't getting on base consistently.

Angels No. 2 hitters rank 29th in the Majors in collective on-base percentage (.235) -- though you can say something similar about several spots in the Angels' struggling lineup.

"The presence you need there is just that drumbeat of on-base percentage," Scioscia said. "It doesn't have to be one guy. And right now, we'll match up if we have to. If there's one guy who's having the type of year of getting on base and takes off with it, that's beautiful. But I don't know if we have that dynamic right now if we're not trying to match up."

Worth noting

• Saturday marked the 50th anniversary of the first no-hitter in Angels history, when Bo Belinsky blanked the Orioles in a 2-0 win at Chavez Ravine on May 5, 1962.

• Friday's 4-0 loss to the Blue Jays marked the first time since 1992 -- against the Royals -- that the Angels were victims of back-to-back shutouts by opposing starters, according to STATS LLC.

• Vernon Wells had only two walks through his first 93 plate appearances before drawing two in Saturday's 6-2 win. It was his first two-walk game since July 16, 2011, and the first time Wells -- who also doubled -- had reached base safely three times since Sept. 3, 2011.