MIA@ARI: Eovaldi fans three over six strong innings

SAN FRANCISCO -- Any questions about Nathan Eovaldi's arm strength were quickly put to rest in his first start since being reinstated from the disabled list.

On Tuesday in a no-decision at Arizona, the Marlins right-hander had his fastball max out at 99 mph.

Eovaldi's amped-up velocity was highly encouraging, especially when you consider he opened the season on the disabled list with right shoulder inflammation.

"I'm not going out there trying to throw as hard as I can -- 100 percent full-out," Eovaldi said. "I'm not trying to overdo it. I'm going out there trying to compete. I guess the ball is coming out a little easier. I feel like my timing is right. I feel if my timing is right and my mechanics are right, good things will come."

According to the FanGraphs website, Eovaldi's fastball averaged 96.9 mph, an increase from the 94.1 mph he averaged in 2012.

"I think Eovaldi gives us another power guy who can go out there and eat up innings," manager Mike Redmond said.

With Eovaldi in the rotation, the Marlins now have two power arms. The 23-year-old joins 20-year-old Jose Fernandez, who averages 94.7 mph with his fastball.

"Power arms are power arms," Redmond said. "That's good stuff. That's what we're looking for. It's nice to have guys come in and throw 96-97. They give us a chance to be really good because they can make mistakes and get away with them. Some guys don't have that ability."

Eovaldi feels the strengthening drills he did during his rehabilitation are part of why he is throwing harder. As maintenance, he is continuing to do band work and icing like he had before.

"I think a lot of it comes from that, learning different ways of taking care of my shoulder, with different workouts, icing more," he said. "I don't know if it has anything to do with it or not. But I feel it definitely has made a difference.

"Because it has made me feel good, and helped me get back to being healthy, why not keep it strong?"

Cishek getting job done in ninth for Marlins

MIA@SF: Cishek retires Posey to seal the victory

SAN FRANCISCO -- For a young team looking to gain confidence and come together, it is important to lock down as many potential wins as possible.

Marlins closer Steve Cishek has been doing his part.

On Friday night, Cishek picked up his 12th save, pitching around two Giants hits in the ninth inning to close out a 6-3 Marlins win.

The Marlins may have the worst record in baseball, but they are 10-8 in June, and they've played against teams like the Cardinals, D-backs and now the Giants.

"We're hitting the ball well," Cishek said. "When people like that start hitting, it becomes contagious. Guys start to relax. We've been playing great defense all year. Our pitching has been a little bit better, too. We've had some quality starts against some quality teams. That's what it's all about."

Cishek has given up one run in nine innings in June, compared to his 5.25 ERA in 12 innings in April.

The Marlins are coming together at a time key players like Giancarlo Stanton and Logan Morrison are back in the lineup. They're starting to see results in close games, as they are now 11-14 in one-run games.

"This is a great test for us," Cishek said. "I don't know how many one-run games or walk-off games we've lost this year, but it's quite a bit. So we're right there. We're really just one big hit away or one big stop away from getting a win.

"Lately, it's been working out for us. We've been able to get that big hit or big stop, or make a big pitch or make a big play. We're hoping we can put it together for the rest of the year, because this is a lot more fun."

Pierre's hitting streak over, ready for new one

MIA@SF: Noonan makes a tough backhanded stop at third

SAN FRANCISCO -- It took a terrific backhanded stop at third base to put an end to Juan Pierre's 14-game hitting streak Thursday night.

Pierre went hitless in four at-bats in Miami's 2-1 win over the Giants at AT&T Park. The closest the veteran outfielder came to extending the string came in the first at-bat of the game.

Pierre slapped a sharp hopper to third base, where Nick Noonan made a backhanded snare and threw across the diamond to first for the out.

"The guy made a good play on me in the first inning, too," Pierre said. "I was like, 'Oh, man. He made a pretty good play.'"

Pierre batted .367 (22-for-60) during the streak.

Getting the speedster on base remains key to igniting the Marlins' offense.

Pierre started the streak on June 2, and he had eight multi-hit games during it. His batting average increased from .218 to .257.

"I was just finding the holes," he said. "That's the biggest thing. I'm doing all my preparation. I was just getting myself in good position to hit, and not fouling balls off that I should be putting in play.

"Other than that, I didn't change anything. I didn't do anything different. Hopefully, I just continue to build on it for the rest of the season."