CHC@STL: Molina takes exception to a high pitch

CHICAGO -- In the eighth inning Thursday, Cubs rookie reliever Neil Ramirez threw a ball inside to Yadier Molina that the Cardinals' catcher didn't like. Molina then turned and said something to the Chicago dugout.

"We told him, 'Hey, why would we want to hit you?'" Cubs manager Rick Renteria said. "There's no purpose -- it would serve nothing at that point. That's all it was."

The Cardinals led, 5-3, and there was a runner at second and two outs in the eighth.

St. Louis manager Mike Matheny defended his catcher's actions.

"Yadi was absolutely right," Matheny told reporters after the game. "At some point, somebody's got to say something. 'No more up here.'

"If you're going to miss and you miss in, that's fine. But you can't keep taking shots up there and expect somebody not to say something."

Ramirez was trying to throw inside, but the Cubs said there was no intent to hit Molina.

"There was nothing there," Renteria said. "Both teams should react exactly the way they reacted. That's baseball. You're competing with two division rivals. Was there any intent to try to hit him? Absolutely not. Are the reactions normal? Sure. It's one of your key players.

"You see a pitch that seemingly looks like it's up and in. If you go back to the video, it wasn't as close as you might think. When a pitch is elevated to the mind's eye, it seems like it's very close. I think everybody reacted the way they should when two teams are competing against each other. There's nothing wrong with the way they showed their emotion."

Chicago and St. Louis don't play each other again until July 25 at Wrigley Field.

Rosscup relieved by MRI results on injured shoulder

MIA@CHC: Rosscup fans Coghlan to notch first career K

CHICAGO -- An MRI revealed Cubs reliever Zac Rosscup has some inflammation in his left shoulder, but he has no structural damage and will resume his throwing program in a week or so.

Rosscup was placed on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday with left shoulder soreness, and he was examined on Thursday by team orthopedic specialist Dr. Stephen Gryzlo.

"I was feeling some discomfort in my shoulder area, so I tried to rehab it a little bit and do some preventative work," Rosscup said Friday. "It wasn't going away, so I figured it was best to get it looked at.

"It's nothing serious. They saw some inflammation and a little bit of fluid, nothing too serious. I should be down for a week or so and then start cranking it up again."

Rosscup had appeared in four games, and he gave up one hit and walked two. He was relieved that there is no structural damage.

"I don't want to hurt the team by going out there and trying to pitch through pain," Rosscup said.

Extra bases

• The Cubs are skipping Jake Arrieta in the rotation to keep Jason Hammel and Jeff Samardzija on schedule, a move that will also give Arrieta some time to work on his mechanics. Arrieta has made three starts since coming off the disabled list, and he has been limited to about 80 pitches each time.

Arrieta started on Tuesday in St. Louis and is scheduled to open the Cubs' series at San Diego on Thursday, and he will have a couple side sessions before that to correct his delivery. Arrieta said he was "too rotational."

Pedro Strop, on the disabled list since May 7 with a left groin strain, is expected to go to the Cubs' facility in Mesa, Ariz., early next week to continue his rehab. There is no timetable for his return.

• Jose Veras needed just five pitches to get two outs in the sixth on Thursday in his first game back after missing time with a strained left oblique. Veras began the season as the Cubs' closer, but for now, Renteria said they will continue to ease the right-hander into games.

"We'll chip away and let him have success and continue to work," Renteria said.

• Kyle Hendricks, the Cubs' Minor League Pitcher of the Year last season, struck out 11 over eight scoreless innings in Triple-A Iowa's 2-0 win over Round Rock on Thursday. Hendricks didn't walk a batter.